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  • The grades six through eight standards define what students should understand and be able to do by the end of each grade. Instruction in grades 6-8 addresses students’ increasing maturity and the growing sophistication of their abilities, culminating in the development by the end of grade 8 of students who are ready to succeed in high school. Students should be able to comprehend more challenging books and articles, basing all of their analyses, inferences, and claims on explicit and relevant evidence from the texts. Students will expand on their ability to identify central ideas by identifying how those themes are shaped and conveyed by particular details. Their analysis of basic literary elements will extend to identifying connections and complexities within narratives and how individual elements weave together to advance plot and reveal character. The evaluation of the impact of language on tone and meaning will begin to include more sophisticated concepts such as analogy and allusion, subtleties in point of view such as dramatic irony, and a more sophisticated appreciation for connotative diction. These skills will be incorporated into the students’ own narrative and expository writing. Students will become increasingly adept at understanding an author’s biases, the use of complex rhetorical devices including logical fallacies, and tailoring their own prose for maximum influence. While continuing with a variety of literary non-fiction, students in grades 6-8 will begin to tackle more technical informational texts as well. Literary selections will include foundational materials from mythology, cultural histories, and religious traditions.


    Course Overview

    Unit 1: Getting to Know You

    Unit 2: What Brings Freedom? Confinement?

    Unit 3: What's So Important About Georgia? <- We are here

    8W2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.

    a. Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

    b. Develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.

    c. Use appropriate and varied transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.

    d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.

    e. Establish and maintain a formal style.

    f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented.

    8RI1 Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

    8RI2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text.

    8RI3 Analyze how a text makes connections among and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events (e.g., through comparisons, analogies, or categories).

    Unit 4: Argument with Logic, Kindness, Respect

    Unit 5: Who Do You Love? 

     Powerpoints 

    PPT for Week of Dec 2

    PPT for Week of Dec 9 - 13