Glenn Hills Elementary School

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Glenn Hills Elementary School

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Georgia Book Award Nominees

  • Book Trailers and Book Talks for Georgia Award Books

    Book Trailers and  Book Talks for Georgia Award Books

    GA Book Awards Info Page UGA

     

    Watch the trailers and vote on your favorite read,

     

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  • The Vanderbeekers of 141st Street

    The Vanderbeekers of 141st Street (The Vanderbeekers #1)
     

    The Vanderbeekers of 141st Street

    by Karina Yan Glaser 

    The Vanderbeekers have always lived in the brownstone on 141st Street. It's practically another member of the family. So when their reclusive, curmudgeonly landlord decides not to renew their lease, the five siblings have eleven days to do whatever it takes to stay in their beloved home and convince the dreaded Beiderman just how wonderful they are. And all is fair in love and war when it comes to keeping their home. 
     
     
    https://youtu.be/cKqSazP7mCs
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  • Clayton Byrd Goes Undergraound

    by Rita Williams-Garcia and Frank Morrison

    Clayton Byrd loves playing the blues harp (harmonica) with his grandfather, Cool Papa Byrd, and other blues musicians in the park. Clayton is eagerly looking forward to the day he’ll finally get the nod from his grandfather to take a solo during one of their performances. When his grandfather dies suddenly, Clayton’s mother is too wrapped up in her own complicated feelings to be sensitive to her son’s grief and sells Cool Papa’s belongings. Struggling in the days that follow—he keeps falling asleep in class—Clayton finally skips school to go in search of the bluesmen in the park. On the subway, he’s mesmerized by a group of kids who beatbox and dance for money. Clayton can’t help but join in on his harmonica, and the boys net their biggest take of the day when they pass the hat. While Clayton likes the younger kids in the group, the oldest teen snatches the hat Clayton is wearing, the last thing Clayton has left from Cool Papa. Determined to get it back, Clayton sticks with the group, bending notes to create a melody matched to their hip-hop beat. A marvelous author’s note on the musical origins of blues and hip-hip and her appreciation for both concludes a story about love and grief and music and family and the importance of being heard. (Ages 8-12)

    © Cooperative Children's Book Center, Univ. of Wisconsin - Madison, 2018

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  • You Go First

    by Erin Entrada Kelly

    Twelve-year-old Charlotte’s dad is hospitalized and she’s scared to visit him. Meanwhile, her best friend wants to move up in the social hierarchy at school and is willing to belittle Charlotte to do so. Eleven-year-old Ben is surprised and then furious when his parents announce they’re divorcing. He throws himself into running for student council treasurer, although his earnest campaign is destined to fail. Both smart and precocious, Charlotte and Ben live in separate cities. Their connection to each other is through an online word game and the online chatting that has grown around their play. Ben is generally oblivious to his social awkwardness and inability to pick up on cues that would no doubt make his transition to middle school easier. Charlotte is more aware of the ways she’s seen as odd. Alternating chapters follow each of their lives over the course of a difficult week, although neither is honest with the other about their current challenges. The parallels offer readers plenty to ponder. So, too, does the fact that Charlotte and Ben’s personalities are a matter of fact, not fault or in need of fixing. When they each connect with someone new at school, it’s clearly because of who they each are, not in spite of it. (Ages 9–12)

    © Cooperative Children's Book Center, Univ. of Wisconsin - Madison, 2019

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  • Front Desk

    Front Desk
     

    Front Desk

    by Kelly Yang

    Mia Tang has a lot of secrets.

    Number 1: She lives in a motel, not a big house. Every day, while her immigrant parents clean the rooms, ten-year-old Mia manages the front desk of the Calivista Motel and tends to its guests.

    Number 2: Her parents hide immigrants. And if the mean motel owner, Mr. Yao, finds out they've been letting them stay in the empty rooms for free, the Tangs will be doomed.

    Number 3: She wants to be a writer. But how can she when her mom thinks she should stick to math because English is not her first language?

    It will take all of Mia's courage, kindness, and hard work to get through this year. Will she be able to hold on to her job, help the immigrants and guests, escape Mr. Yao, and go for her dreams?
     
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  • The Truth as Told by Mason Buttle

    The Truth as Told by Mason Buttle
     

    The Truth as Told by Mason Buttle

     by Leslie Connor

    Mason Buttle is the biggest, sweatiest kid in his grade, and everyone knows he can barely read or write. Mason’s learning disabilities are compounded by grief. Fifteen months ago, Mason’s best friend, Benny Kilmartin, turned up dead in the Buttle family’s orchard. An investigation drags on, and Mason, honest as the day is long, can’t understand why Lieutenant Baird won’t believe the story Mason has told about that day.

    Both Mason and his new friend, tiny Calvin Chumsky, are relentlessly bullied by the other boys in their neighborhood, so they create an underground club space for themselves. When Calvin goes missing, Mason finds himself in trouble again. He’s desperate to figure out what happened to Calvin, and eventually, Benny.

    But will anyone believe him?
     
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  • Walking with Miss Millie

    Walking with Miss Millie

    Walking with Miss Millie

    by Tamara Bundy

    A poignant middle grade debut about the friendship between a white girl and an elderly black woman in the 1960s South

    Alice is angry at having to move to Rainbow, Georgia—a too small, too hot, dried-up place she’s sure will never feel like home. Then she gets put in charge of walking her elderly neighbor’s dog. But Clarence won’t budge without Miss Millie, so Alice and Miss Millie walk him together. Strolling with Miss Millie quickly becomes the highlight of Alice’s day, as she learns about the town’s past and meets a mix of its catty and kind residents. As the two become confidantes, Alice is finally able to express her heartache over her father’s desertion; and when Miss Millie tells her family story, Alice begins to understand the shameful history of Segregation, and recognize the racism they need to fight against. Navigating the neighborhood with Miss Millie gives Alice new perspective, the wisdom to move on from her anger, and even enables her to laugh again.

    Tamara Bundy’s beautifully written story reminds readers that there is nothing like friendship to lighten one’s load, and make anyplace a home.
     

    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/32614258-walking-with-miss-millie?from_search=true

     

    https://youtu.be/wIKHd9GlgcE

     

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  • Granted

    Granted

    Granted

    by John David Anderson

    From the author of beloved novels Ms. Bixby’s Last Day and Posted comes a hilarious, heartfelt, and unforgettable novel about a fairy-in-training.

    Everyone who wishes upon a star, or a candle, or a penny thrown into a fountain knows that you’re not allowed to tell anyone what you’ve wished for. But even so, there is someone out there who hears it. 

    In a magical land called the Haven lives a young fairy named Ophelia Delphinium Fidgets. Ophela is no ordinary fairy—she is a Granter: one of the select fairies whose job it is to venture out into the world and grant the wishes of unsuspecting humans every day.

    It’s the work of the Granters that generates the magic that allows the fairies to do what they do, and to keep the Haven hidden and safe. But with worldwide magic levels at an all-time low, this is not as easy as it sounds. On a typical day, only a small fraction of the millions of potential wishes gets granted.

    Today, however, is anything but typical. Because today, Ophelia is going to get her very first wish-granting assignment.

    And she’s about to discover that figuring out how to truly give someone what they want takes much more than a handful of fairy dust.

    https://www.harpercollins.com/9780062643865/granted/

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  • The Parker Inheritance

    The Parker Inheritance

    The Parker Inheritance

    by Varian Johnson

    At her late grandmother’s house in Lambert, South Carolina, African American Candice discovers an old letter referencing a hidden treasure in town, one it turns out her grandmother tried to find years before to help the city. Instead, she lost her job. Candice, who loves puzzles, teams with neighbor Brandon, who has internet access and research skills , in hopes of finding it and redeeming her grandmother’s reputation. While details about their lives unfold—Candice’s parents are separated; Brandon is dealing with a bully and a disapproving grandfather—the clues they follow reveal Lambert’s mid-twentieth century history. Chapters set in the past follow middle-class Siobhan, the talented, forthright daughter of the tennis coach at the Black high school, who falls in love with poor Reggie, the best player on the team. But Siobhan’s father, a Black man who’s worked hard to get where he is, doesn’t approve. When a secret 1957 match between the white and Black boys’ tennis teams triggers a violent racist attack after the Black team wins, Siobhan’s family and Reggie must flee town for their own safety. The teens’ resulting separation is at the heart of the mystery in this entertaining homage to The Westing Game (favorite book of several characters) that deftly yet meaningfully incorporates social justice issues from the present (e.g., ongoing racism, homophobia) and the past. (Ages 8–11)

    © Cooperative Children's Book Center, Univ. of Wisconsin - Madison, 2019

    https://youtu.be/IUiLIVxVogo

     

    https://youtu.be/E-JwvBhbhGA

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  • Wishtree

    Wishtree

    Wishtree

    by Katherine Applegate

    Trees can't tell jokes, but they can certainly tell stories. . . .

    Red is an oak tree who is many rings old. Red is the neighborhood "wishtree"—people write their wishes on pieces of cloth and tie them to Red's branches. Along with her crow friend Bongo and other animals who seek refuge in Red's hollows, this "wishtree" watches over the neighborhood.

    You might say Red has seen it all. Until a new family moves in. Not everyone is welcoming, and Red's experiences as a wishtree are more important than ever.

    Funny, deep, warm, and nuanced, this is Katherine Applegate at her very best—writing from the heart, and from a completeluy unexpected point of view.

    https://www.wishtreebook.com/

    https://youtu.be/Uf6z8CN1PNM

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