• Make-up Work/Grade Improvement

    Generally it is best if students stay on top of their work at all times.  However, if students struggle with a subject and do poorly on an assignment or quiz, they may certainly

    re-do some of that work and re-examine the material so that they learn what they need to learn.  Also, this allows them to have extra control over the grades they earn.  Here is what

    can be made up and how to earn back grade points...

     

    Word Work Assessments (Vocabulary and Spelling)

    Students can recover ¾ of all missed points on spelling assessments by doing the following…

    Rewrite each of the misspelled words two ways – once in a pyramid and once in multicolored syllables.

    For incorrect words on the sentence section…write two sentences that use incorrect words from the sentence portion in the correct way.  You may use the sentence in the test as one of your sentences!

    Other sections may simply be re-copied in the correct manner.

     

    Reading Homework

    If students have failed to complete their reading log, they may make that reading up within two weeks, but the make-up log must include the actual dates of the reading time, 

    the required text interactions and a parent signature.

     

    Writing Assignments

    Students may re-submit a writing project assignment within one week of its return.  Late work will be worth 3/4 points.  Work that is being rewritten to produce a better product

    will be scored just like the original product.  

     

    Social Studies Assessments

    For social studies quizzes students may also receive ¾ of their points back. 

    They can do so by writing two sentences to explain what the correct answer should be for incorrect quiz questions. 

    For example:  If they wrote that the Panama Canal was finished in 1902, and received an incorrect score for that, they could write the following: 

    The Panama Canal was started by the French, who gave up on it in 1898.  In 1904, the US started building the canal and finished in 1914.