• Duties of Citizenship

    Obey the law: Laws are created to keep citizens safe and to keep order in society. By obeying laws, citizens contribute to the peace, safety, and order of their community.
    Pay taxes:  Citizens pay taxes to support government projects that directly benefit citizens. Taxes are used to pay for road repairs, government workers (officials, police officers, firefighters, teachers, etc.), schools, and more!
    Defend the nation:  Citizens have a duty to protect their country. Some citizens volunteer to serve in the U.S Army, U.S. Navy, U.S. Air Force, Marine Corps and Coast Guard. These citizens protect citizens at home and abroad.
    Serve in court:  Citizens have the duty to serve as jurors in the court system. Jurors have the responsibility of listening to court cases and making informed decisions.
    Attend school:  States provide free education to students, typically aged between 7 and 16. Attending schools prepare students for future workplace environments and teaches them how to collaborate with others and solve problems.

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  • Losing Citizenship HW

    Expatriation:  When a person swears loyalty to another country. By doing this, they give up their U.S. citizenship.

    Denaturalization: (This only applies to citizens who went through the naturalization process.) If the U.S. government discovers that a naturalized citizen lied during the application process, their citizenship can be revoked and they can be deported to their home country. 

    Conviction:  Citizens convicted of certain crimes can lose their U.S. citizenship. These crimes include; treason, taking part in a rebellion, or trying to overthrow the government. 

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  • Naturalization foldable

    Application

    Potential applicants must send in an application to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services department. Before the application is seriously considered, the applicant must meet five requirements:
    1.Must be 18 or over
    2.Must be a permanent resident for at least 5 years (or be a permanent resident for 3 years and be the spouse of a U.S. citizen)
    3.Must be of good moral character
    4.Must have an understanding of U.S. civics
    5.Must be able to read, write, and speak English

    Citizenship Exam:

    Applicants for naturalization must take and pass an exam that tests their ability to read, write, and speak English while answering a number of questions about U.S. history and government.


    Ceremony:

    If applicants pass the exam, they proceed to a ceremony where they take an oath to be loyal to the United States.

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  • The Origins of Citizenship HW

    Greece: Democracy began in ancient Greece. Athens had a direct democracy –votes and decisions came directly from citizens, not representatives. Most government officials were chosen via a lottery system, meaning that every male citizen had the chance to participate in government, regardless of their status or popularity. Only men who had military training were considered citizens.

    Rome: In ancient Rome, citizens (only men who were not enslaved) had the right to vote, own property, defend themselves in court, and have a fair trial, among other rights. The children of Roman citizens automatically became Roman citizens.

    The United States: Citizenship in the United States has changed dramatically over time. Originally, citizenship was reserved for white men. Over time, African Americans, Native Americans were given citizenship and voting rights were expanded. Today, citizenship in the United States is not based on gender, religion, wealth, or race.

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  • Vocabulary

    1.citizen–a member of a community who owes loyalty to a community and government. They deserve to have their rights protected.
    2.citizenship–the rights, responsibilities, and duties of a citizen.
    3.civics –the study of the rights, responsibilities, and duties of citizens.
    4.naturalization–the legal process to gain citizenship to a country.
    5.responsibility–things a citizen shoulddo of their own free will.
    6.duty–things a person is required to do as a citizen of a country.

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