• Duties of Citizenship

    Obey the law: Laws are created to keep citizens safe and to keep order in society. By obeying laws, citizens contribute to the peace, safety, and order of their community.
    Pay taxes:  Citizens pay taxes to support government projects that directly benefit citizens. Taxes are used to pay for road repairs, government workers (officials, police officers, firefighters, teachers, etc.), schools, and more!
    Defend the nation:  Citizens have a duty to protect their country. Some citizens volunteer to serve in the U.S Army, U.S. Navy, U.S. Air Force, Marine Corps and Coast Guard. These citizens protect citizens at home and abroad.
    Serve in court:  Citizens have the duty to serve as jurors in the court system. Jurors have the responsibility of listening to court cases and making informed decisions.
    Attend school:  States provide free education to students, typically aged between 7 and 16. Attending schools prepare students for future workplace environments and teaches them how to collaborate with others and solve problems.

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  • Losing Citizenship HW

    Expatriation:  When a person swears loyalty to another country. By doing this, they give up their U.S. citizenship.

    Denaturalization: (This only applies to citizens who went through the naturalization process.) If the U.S. government discovers that a naturalized citizen lied during the application process, their citizenship can be revoked and they can be deported to their home country. 

    Conviction:  Citizens convicted of certain crimes can lose their U.S. citizenship. These crimes include; treason, taking part in a rebellion, or trying to overthrow the government. 

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  • The Origins of Citizenship HW

    Origins of Citizenship

     

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  • Interactive Social Studies Textbook

    On line Social Studies Textbook

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  • 5th Grade Geography Standards SS5G1a. and SS5G1b.

    Important Man made and physical features of the United States
     Geographic Understandings SS5G1 The student will locate important places in the United States. 
    *******Be Able to locate these on a blank map of the US.****
    a. Locate important man-made places; include the Chisholm Trail; Pittsburgh, PA; Kitty Hawk, NC; Pearl Harbor, HI; Montgomery, AL; and Chicago, IL.. 

    SS5G2 Explain the reasons for the spatial patterns of economic activities.
    a. Locate primary agricultural and industrial locations between the end of the Civil War and 1900 and explain how factors such as population, transportation, and resources have influenced these areas (e.g., Pittsburgh’s rapid growth in the late nineteenth century).
    b. Locate primary agricultural and industrial locations since the turn of the 20th century and explain how factors such as population, transportation, and resources have influenced these areas (e.g., Chicago’s rapid growth at the turn of the century).
     
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    Chisholm Trail

     
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    Chisholm Trail

    A former cattle trail from San Antonio, Texas, north to Abilene, Kansas. It was important from the 1860s to the 1880s, when it fell into disuse following the expansion of the railroads and the introduction of barbed-wire fencing.
     

     
     
     
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    Map of Pennsylvania

    Can you find Gettysburg and Pittsburg?
     

     
     
     
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    Kitty Hawk, NC

    The Wright Brothers flew the first airplane here.
     

     
     
     
     
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    Pearl Harbor, Hawaii

    Japanese bombers attacked an unsuspecting Hawaii on December 7, 1941.
     

     
     
     
     
     
     
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    Montgomery, Alabama

    This was an important place during the Civil Rights Movement
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