•  Advanced Placement United States History: Course Syllabus 

     

    Course Overview:

    This course has dual, interrelated goals: to provide the student with a college-level experience and to prepare the student for the AP Exam. An emphasis is placed on interpreting documents, mastering a significant body of factual information, and writing critical essays. This course will fulfill the United States history graduation requirement and the Georgia Common Core standards. 

    Pre-twentieth century topics include life and thought in colonial America, the catalysts and ideology of the American Revolution, the development of the U.S. Constitution, Jeffersonian and Jacksonian democracy, mid-nineteenth century reform movements, Manifest Destiny, Civil War and Reconstruction, Gilded Age, immigration,  industrialization, urban growth, and Populism. Twentieth century topics include imperialism, World War I, the Roaring Twenties, the Great Depression and the New Deal, World War II, and post-war America.
     
    In addition to the topics listed above, the course will emphasize a series of key themes throughout the year as determined by the College Board:

    American diversity
    Globalization
    Environment
    Reform
    Interdependence
    Cultural development
    War and diplomacy
    Demographic changes
    Religion
    Federalism
    Economic transformation
    Slavery and its legacies
    Politics and citizenship
    Social development

    The course will trace these themes throughout the year, emphasizing the ways in which they are interconnected and examining the ways in which each helps to shape the changes over time that are so important to understanding United States history. Additionally, extensive instruction in the analysis and interpretation of primary sources as well as historical scholarship will be conducted throughout the entire course.

    Textbooks: By The People (AP Edition)

    Fraser, James W. By The People: A History of the United States, AP Edition. New York University, Pearson E ducation, 2015

     

     

                                                                                                                                   First Semester

     

    Time Allotment: 3 weeks (Contact and Exploration, 1491-1607 and Settlements, Alliances and Resistance, 1607- 1718

    Required Reading: By The People (AP Edition): Chapters 1-4

    Chapter 1: “The World Before 1492 ”

    Chapter 2: “First Encounters, First Conquests, 1492-1607”

    Chapter 3: “Settlements, Alliances, and Resistance, 1607-1718”

    Chapter 4: "Creating the Culture of British North America, 1689-1754”

     

     Key Themes: Cultural cooperation and conflict, Globalization, Economic Transformations, American diversity, Evolution of Democracy, Religion

     Key Topics: Exploration, Slavery, Mercantilism, Chesapeake and Southern colonies, New England and the Puritans, dissent, colonial politics, the middle colonies, the Great Awakening

     Key Skills: Vertical Team Strategies: Reading and Writing Skills

     

    Possible Activities: Review of Cornell Note-taking system

    Analysis of primary source documents: Mayflower Compact, Fundamental Orders of Connecticut, Puritan Prayer, Bacon’s Declaration

    Comparison chart on the major European colonial models

    Comparison chart of the three colonial regions

     

    Possible Assessments: Chapter quizzes

    Multiple-choice unit test

    In-class Essay: Comparison of Chesapeake and New England regional development

    FRQ: Influence of religion on development of colonial society

                                    

    Time Allotment: 3 weeks (A New Birth of Freedom- Creating The United States of America, 1754-1800

    Required Reading: By The People (AP Edition): Chapters 5-7

     

    Chapter 5: “The Making of a Revolution, 1754-1783”

    Chapter 6: “Creating A Nation, 1783-1788”

    "Creating a Government: Writing the U.S. Constitution Constitution"

    Chapter 7: “Practicing Democracy, 1789-1800"

     

    Primary Source Document:  “Remember the Ladies” by Abigail Adams

    Key Themes: War and Diplomacy, Politics and Citizenship, Economic Transformations, American Identity, Slavery

    Key Topics: Consequences of the French and Indian War, Roots of revolution, Salutary Neglect, Failure of diplomacy, American Revolution, Life on the Home front, Women and Minorities in the                   war, Economic developments, Foundation of government,Hamilton’s Financial Plan, Presidential Precedents, Peaceful succession of power, Marshall Court, Two-Party System, Farewell Address, Alien and Sedition Acts, Neutrality, Economic independence, War of 1812, Era of “Good Feelings”,

    Possible Activities: Analysis of primary source documents: Treaty of Paris, 1763; Treaty of Paris, 1783; Patrick Henry’s “St. John’s Episcopal Church Speech”; Declaration of Independence; Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom; Virginia Plan; New Jersey Plan; U.S. Constitution; Bill of Rights

     

    Potential Assessments: Chapter quizzes

    Multiple-choice unit test

    Essays: DBQ: Impact of Revolution on slaves and women

    FRQ: The Revolution as The Revolution as a radical change
    2007b FRQ: Impact of the French and Indian War  
    2010: Analysis of US victory in the Revolutionary War

     

    Time Allotment: 3 weeks (Crafting a Nation, People, Land and National Identity)

    Required Reading: By The People (AP Edition): Chapters 8-10

      

    Chapter 8: “Creating a New People, Expanding the Country 1801-1823”

    Chapter 9: “New Industries, New Politics, 1815-1828”

    Chapter 10: “Democracy in the Age of Andrew Jackson 1828-1844”

     

    Key Themes: War and Diplomacy, Politics and Citizenship, Economic Transformations, American Identity, American Diversity, Slavery, Demographic Changes, Culture

    Key Topics:  Expansionism, Monroe Doctrine, Sectionalism, Age of the Common Man, Native Americans, Sectionalism, Free market economy, Immigration, Nativism, Reform movements, Plantation system, Transcendentalism

    Key Skills: Reading and Writing Skills

    Possible  Activities: Analysis of primary source documents: Farewell Address; Alien and Sedition Acts; Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions; Marbury v.  Madison; McCulloch v. Maryland; Monroe                               Doctrine.
                                 Discussion forums on key political viewpoints and events

    Potential Assessments: Chapter quizzes

    Multiple-choice unit test

    Essays: 2002 DBQ: Impact on stability of government during the Washington, Adams and Jefferson Admin.
    1994 FRQ: Impact of Domestic and Foreign Events of the 1970s
    2003 FRQ: Impact of the Transportation Improvements of 1820-1840
    2004 FRQ: Impact of the Revolution of 1800

                                                                                                                           First Quarter Complete.

    Time Allotment: 3 weeks (Manifest Destiny and Sectionalism)

    Required Reading: By The People (AP Edition): Chapters 11-13

     

    Chapter 11: “Manifest Destiny: Expanding the Nation,1830-1853”

    Chapter 12: “Living in a Nation of Changing Lands, Faces and Expectations, 1831-1854”

    Chapter 13: “The Politics of Separation, 1850-1861”

     

    Key Themes: Politics and Citizenship, Economic Transformations, American Identity, American Diversity, Slavery, Reform, Religion Demographic Changes, Culture, Sectionalism

    Key Topics: Mexican War, Manifest Destiny, Abolitionism, Compromises, Expansionism, Sectionalism, “Positive Good” Theory, Secession, Popular Sovereignty, Dred Scott Decision, Republican Party Platform, Election of 1860, Failure of Compromise

    Key Skills: Reading and Writing Skills

    Possible Activities: Map of the Expansion of the United States

    Expansionism and sectionalism studied through art. Primary Source Analysis: John O’ Sullivan on Manifest Destiny; James K. Polk’s diary excerpt; James K. Polk’s War Message to                    Congress; Treaty of Oregon, 1846; Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo; Excerpt from Uncle Tom’s Cabin; Dred Scott v. Sanford; Kansas-Nebraska Act,Evaluation of the Republican Party                    Platform

    Document analysis of primary sources:

    South Carolina Exposition and Protest
    Jackson’s Force Bill
    Indian Removal Act
    Angelina Grimke on slavery
    Dorothea Dix on prison reform 

    Possible Assessments: Chapter quizzes

    Multiple-choice unit test                  

    Essays: 1990 DBQ: Jacksonian Democrats
    2002 DBQ: Reform movements of Jacksonian Democracy
    2006 DBQ: American Motherhood for 1770-1860
    2007b FRQ: Immigration Experiences from 1830 - 1860

     

    Time Allotment: 3 weeks

    Required Reading: By The People (AP Edition): Chapters 11-15

                                     

    Chapter 14: “And the War Came:The Civil War, 1861-1865”

    Chapter 15: “Reconstruction, 1865-1877”

    Chapter 16: “Conflict in The West, 1865-1912

     

    Key Themes: War and Diplomacy, Politics and Citizenship, Economic Transformations, American Identity, American Diversity, Slavery, Demographic Changes, Culture, Sectionalism, Reform,Wartime diplomacy, Economic changes, Impact of war on Blacks and Women, Wartime strategies, Emancipation Proclamation, The Gettysburg Address, Legacy of the war, Politics and economics of Reconstruction, Impeachment politics, War and Diplomacy, Politics and Citizenship, Economic Transformations, American Identity, American Diversity, Slavery, Demographic Changes, Culture, Reform

    Key Skills: Reading and Writing Skills

    Possible Assessments: Chapter quizzes

    Multiple-choice unit test

    Primary source document work: Lincoln’s First and Second Inaugural Addresses;Gettysburg Address; Emancipation Proclamation; Civil War Amendments,  Charting of Black Reconstruction programs

    Essays: 1997 DBQ: Impact on expansionism on national unity

    2005 DBQ: Failure of Compromise in 1860

    2005 FRQ: Impact of the Mexican War on sectionalism

    2010b DBQ: Impact of territorial expansion on federal government policy

     

    Time Allotment: 3 weeks

    Required Reading: By The People (AP Edition): Chapters 17-19
                                                

    Chapter 17: “The Gilded Age, 1876-1913”

    Chapter 18: “Responses to Industrialization, Responses to Change, 1877-1914”

    Chapter 19: “Progressive Movements, Progressive Politics, 1879-1917”

     

    Key Themes: Politics and Citizenship, Nativism, Reform, Economic Transformations, American Identity, American Diversity, Demographic Changes, Culture, Environment, Globalization

    Key Topics: Urbanization, Industrialization, Globalization, Reformation, Immigration, Populism, Progressivism, Conservatism, Nativism

    Key Skills:Reading and Writing Skills

     

    Possible Activities: Primary source document work: Excerpts from the “Interstate Commerce Act”; “Sherman Anti-Trust Act; Ida Tarbell’s History of the Standard Oil Company; Lincoln Steffens’ Shame of the Cities; Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle; John Spargo’s Bitter Cry of the Children; the “Pure Food and Drug Act”; the “Meat Inspection  Act”; the “Elkins Act”; the Keating-Owen Act; Muller v. Oregon

    Comparison chart of Populism and Progressivism

    Charting of Progressive Reforms

    Comparison of the three Progressive Presidents

    Possible Assessments: Chapter quizzes

    Multiple-choice unit test Essays:
    2000 DBQ: Role of women from 1875-1900
    1987 FRQ: Role of industrial and agrarian sectors
    2007 DBQ: Agricultural Revolution
    2008 FRQ: Assessment of the “New South”
    2009 FRQ: Assessment of the labor movement’s success
    2010b FRQ: Effectiveness of Progressive Era reformers

    Possible Assessments: Chapter quizzes

    Multiple-choice unit test

    Essays: 2003 FRQ: Impact of the Civil War

    2006 FRQ: Role of the government following the Civil War

    2009b DBQ: Impact of African Americans on the Civil War

                                                                                                                2nd Quarter Complete          End of 1st Semester

     

    Time Allotment: 3 weeks

    Required Reading: By The People (AP Edition): Chapters 20-22

     

    Chapter 20: “Foreign Policy and War in a Progressive Era, 1890--1919”

    Chapter 21: “A Unique, Prosperous, and Discontented Time, 1919-1929”

    Chapter 22: “Living in Hard Times, 1929-1939”

     

    Key Themes: War and Diplomacy, Globalization, American Identity, Economic Transformations, Demographic Changes, Culture

    Key Topics: Overseas expansion, Spanish-American War, Foreign Policy, America on the World Stage, World War I in Europe and on the Home front, Propaganda and civil liberties in WWI, Treaty of Versailles, Isolationism, League of Nations, The Red Scare, Immigration, Economic growth of the 1920’s, the Jazz Age and the Harlem Renaissance, Traditionalism versus modernism, Isolationism and foreign debt of the 1920’s, Diplomacy in the 1920’s and 1930’s, The Great Depression and the New Deal, Cultural changes of the 1930’s

    Key Skills: Reading and Writing Skills

    Possible Activities:  Analysis of primary source documents: “Teller Amendment”; “Platt Amendment”; Wilson’s War Message to Congress; Fourteen Points; “Dollar Diplomacy”; Treaty of Versailles -  Negotiating the Treaty of Versailles, Radio interviews of famous people of the 1920s, Analysis of primary source documents: Washington Disarmament Conference; National Origins Act; Immigration Restriction Act; Examination of “What is Normalcy?”,  Chart of New Deal Programs

                                    

    Possible Assessments:  Chapter quizzes
    Multiple-choice unit test
    Essays: 1986 DBQ: Changing attitudes of the 1920s
    2003 DBQ: Success of Progressive reforms
    2003 FRQ:  FDR and the New Deal
    2008b FRQ: Spanish-American War as a turning point in US foreign policy

     

    Time Allotment: 3 Weeks

    Required Reading: By The People (AP Edition): Chapters 23-25

     

    Chapter 23: “Living In A World at War, 1939-1945”

    Chapter 24: “The World the War Created,1945-1952”

    Chapter 25: “Complacency and Change, 1952-1965”

    Chapter 26: "Lives Changed, 1961-1968”                            

    Key Themes: Politics and citizenship, Economic Transformations, Environment, Culture, Demographic Changes, American Identity, War and Diplomacy, Globalization  

    Key Topics: Economic Transformation, Environment, Culture, American Identity, American Diversity, Nativism, Politics and Citizenship, Demographic Changes  

    Key Skills: Reading and Writing Skills

     

    Possible Assessments:  
    Chapter quizzes
    Multiple-choice unit test
    Essays: 1987 FRQ: Impact of World War II on blacks and women
    2002 FRQ: Comparison of 1st and 2nd World Wars
    2004 FRQ: Foreign policy changes from 1920-1941

     

    Time Allotment:  3 Weeks

    Required Readings: By The People (AP Edition): Chapters 27-30

    Chapter 27: “Rights, Reactions andLimits, 1968-1980”

    Chapter 28: “The Reagan Revolution, 1980-1989”

    Chapter 29: "ANew World Order, 1989-2001"

    Chapter 30: "Entering a New Time, 2001-Present"

     

    Key Themes: Environment, War and diplomacy, Politics and Citizenship, American Identity, American Diversity, Culture, Nativism, Reform, Economic Transformations, Globalization, Evolution of Democracy, Demographic changes

     

    Key Topics:  Post-war economic prosperity, the baby boom, Communism and containment, diplomacy and the Marshall Plan, McCarthyism and the Red Scare, Korea and Vietnam, the United States as a World Power, the Civil  Rights movement, the Space Race, Lyndon Johnson and the Great Society, post WWII immigration and demographic changes, Conservatism, economic stagnation, environmental issues, feminism and the women’s movement, Affirmative Action, Reaganomics, globalization, war and diplomacy in the Middle East, Post WWII politics, post-9/11 America

    Key Skills: Reading and Writing skills

    Possible Activities: Analysis of primary source documents: Crimea Conference; Yalta Conference; Quotes by Harry S. Truman, George Kennan, Winston Churchill, John Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson, Ronald Reagan; Betty Friedan’s Feminine Mystique; Martin Luther King’s “I have a dream” speech, “Letter from a Birmingham Jail”; “War on Poverty Speech”, Civil Rights Act of 1964; Voting Rights Act of 1965; 24th Amendment; Black Panther Party Platform                                 

    Possible Assessments:  Chapter quizzes

    Multiple-choice unit test

    Essays: 2003 FRQ: Compare the 1920s and 1950s societies

    2004 FRQ: Determine success of containment

    2005 FRQ: 20th century women

    2008 DBQ: Vietnam War

    2010 FRQ: Population shifts from 1945-1

     

     

                                                                                                                             End of 3rd Quarter

     

    AP EXAM REVIEW

    EOC Review

     

    Required Readings: By The People (AP Edition)

     

    Examine the following strands of United States History:

     

    ·Economics

    ·Expansion

    ·Immigration

    ·Diplomacy

    ·Political Parties

    ·Evolution of Democracy

    ·Reform

    ·Women

    ·African-Americans

     Assessment: Mock AP Exam – April